Author Topic: In reference to Jolley  (Read 605 times)

Ian H

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In reference to Jolley
« on: October 25, 2013, 07:40:00 AM »
Tom Roberts is one of my favourite artists. His paintings capture Australians being Australians Shearing the rams capture the true swagman at work. on the side of the painting is the stereotypical swagman of the time. Squatting in moleskin trousers a blue shirt with black jerkin . A hearty beard and a battered felt hat. Up the back he even manages to get a pannakin The man standing right at the back with the over large cup is actually drinking from a pannakin.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a2/Tom_Roberts_-_Shearing_the_Rams.jpg

Ian

EverJack

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Re: In reference to Jolley
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2013, 09:48:13 AM »
A good picture of the shearing, and the swaggies...........

Ed

Ian H

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Re: In reference to Jolley
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2013, 06:28:05 PM »
Ed
Before my hut was destroyed I had a Tom Roberts print on the wall. But shearing the rams wasn't one of my favourites. But researching Jolley I had another look at it. It is amazing how much of the life of a swagman he put in it. Every character in it is making a statement about the life of a swagman.

I looked at this painting on two of my computers. In one you couldn't make out the pannikin but on the one with a better video card the pannikin stood clearly out.

Ian

Cathrobin

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Re: In reference to Jolley
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2013, 11:56:01 PM »
Thanks so much for posting this picture--and explaining it.  I now have a picture as I read your wonderful story.  Cathleen

Ian H

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Re: In reference to Jolley
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2013, 07:52:33 AM »
Cathleen every time I look at that painting I wonder did Roberts have any hint of the revolution that started just months after this painting was finished. The very same industrious men would rise up in revolution and both Australia Hisrory and World history was in for a big change. Though the English called it a strike it was really a revolution. It was a draw.There are no figgures I can find on how many swagmen died. The newspaper were full of reported deaths of English men at the hands of the wild ruffians. We know of at least one swagman death. A ring leader who committed suiciderather than give up his mates. And his ghost can be heard even today as we sing our national song. 'Once A jolly swagman'

Ian