Author Topic: My Beard is White Now: Chapter 18: 2  (Read 1480 times)

Cathrobin

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My Beard is White Now: Chapter 18: 2
« on: March 28, 2013, 03:33:05 AM »
Siobhan slapped the dish towel against the counter alongside the sink and stepped into the hallway to shout upstairs.  “Seamus!   Seamus!”

First the dog’s face appeared around the corner at the top of the stairs, and then her son’s, blank with worry.  Instantly, Siobhan’s heart softened. 

Her son had thought he had done something wrong, when in fact her precious boy never did anything against her wishes. 

She smiled up at him and his shoulders relaxed.  “Did Sophie tell you where she was going?”

“When?”

Impatience flooded back into Siobhan.  “This morning.”

Dog and boy tumbled down the steps. 

“Don’t be mad, Momma.  Don’t be mad.  Sophie didn’t do anything wrong.  You always yell at Sophie.”

It was true.  Lately, Siobhan and her daughter seemed to end every conversation yelling at each other.

Siobhan knelt in front of her son and hugged him close.  “I’m not mad, Sweetheart.  I just wondered if she said anything to you about where she was going this morning.”

The boy shook his head solemnly and Francie sat beside his young master, tilting her head in concern. 

It was remarkable how the pup seemed to respond to every shift in the young boy’s mood. 

Then Seamus grinned, and Francie opened her mouth, letting her tongue hang out.  Siobhan couldn’t help thinking the dog also was grinning. 

“Momma, it’s Monday.  She went to work in Uncle Tony’s fields, remember?”

Siobhan reached across to ruffle up her son’s hair.  “Of course.  I just forgot.”

Seamus pulled his head out from under her hand.  “Momma!  Stop doing that.  I’m not a little boy any more.”

She reached to hug her son but he dodged her arms and boy and dog bounded back up the stairs. 

“I’m teaching Francie to pick up my pijamas and put them in the basket.  She already knows how to pick up my socks and put them away.”

Siobhan shook her head and walked back into the kitchen, her mind traveling to the possible places her daughter may have gone. 

She stood in front of the window over the kitchen sink and her eyes absently traveled across her own fields to Tony’s a half a mile away. 

She could make out the backs of several POW’s bent over cultivating the soil of the rows between Tony’s beans. Her interest sharpened and she squinted, focusing.

Suddenly, she could see, she could see with a mother’s eye, the way a mother’s eye could see something where there had been no sign, no evidence, no premonition.
©ccrobinson

Jim

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Re: My Beard is White Now: Chapter 18: 2
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2013, 05:08:32 AM »
Okay!  This is a neat place to end --Suddenly, she could see, she could see with a mother’s eye, the way a mother’s eye could see something where there had been no sign, no evidence, no premonition.

I think that would make me get up, get a cup of coffee and try to read another chapter.   Reminds me of my Mother - I think she could read me by the way I walked.  I do something and just walk in.  She'd say are you going to tell me now or are you going to wait till I ask you a direct questoin..   

Ian H

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Re: My Beard is White Now: Chapter 18: 2
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2013, 09:04:10 AM »
Cathleen
What is it about girls and their mothers? I found this very readable indeed.

Ian

EverJack

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Re: My Beard is White Now: Chapter 18: 2
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2013, 09:05:44 AM »
The plot thickens, as they say....... A very nice cliffhanger, Cathleen.

I'm trying to picture how hard it would be to see a person a half mile away.  Should it be, maybe, a quarter mile?.......  Your choice.

Ed

Cathrobin

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Re: My Beard is White Now: Chapter 18: 2
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2013, 12:51:22 AM »
Thanks, Jack and Ian, for your comments.  They encourage me.  Good point, Jack.  I think I'll make it a quarter of a mile away.  Cathleen